In 2015, world leaders agreed to 17 Global Goals (officially known as the Sustainable Development Goals or SDGs). It’s now five years on, and we have more work than ever to do. These goals have the power to create a better world by 2030, by ending poverty, fighting inequality and addressing the urgency of climate change. Guided by the goals, it is now up to all of us, governments, businesses, civil society and the general public to work together to build a better future for everyone.

Learn more about the specific SDG targets.

There are four guiding principles for the SDGs:
Universality: the goals apply in every country, including Canada.
Integration: achievement of any one goal is linked to the achievement of the others.
Aspiration: there is a need to move past business as usual and seek transformational solutions.
Leaving No One Behind: success depends on the inclusion of the poorest and most vulnerable.

The Sustainable Development Goals are the blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. They address the global challenges we face, including poverty, inequality, climate change, environmental degradation, peace and justice.

Learn how MSVU researchers are taking action: (Under Construction)

No Poverty

Dr. Jennifer Brady, Applied Human Nutrition

Dr. Brady’s research explores the intersections of food, health, and social justice, with an emphasis on health professions’ roles in social justice as practitioners and advocates. Health professions can and should play an important part in redressing social and structural inequities that contribute to poverty, food insecurity, sexism, racism, and other forms of oppression that limit sustainable development around the world.

Dr. Kyly Whitfield, Applied Human Nutrition

Zero Hunger

Dr. Jennifer Brady, Applied Human Nutrition

Dr. Brady’s research explores the intersections of food, health, and social justice, with an emphasis on health professions’ roles in social justice as practitioners and advocates. Health professions can and should play an important part in redressing social and structural inequities that contribute to poverty, food insecurity, sexism, racism, and other forms of oppression that limit sustainable development around the world.

Dr. Kyly Whitfield, Applied Human Nutrition

Good Health and Well-being

Dr. Jennifer Brady, Applied Human Nutrition

Dr. Brady’s research explores the intersections of food, health, and social justice, with an emphasis on health professions’ roles in social justice as practitioners and advocates. Health professions can and should play an important part in redressing social and structural inequities that contribute to poverty, food insecurity, sexism, racism, and other forms of oppression that limit sustainable development around the world.

Dr. Derek Fisher, Psychology

 

Dr. Kyly Whitfield, Applied Human Nutrition

 

Dr. Phillip Joy, Applied Human Nutrition

Dr. Joy’s work seeks to improve health, wellbeing, and equality for gender diverse groups, such as LGBTQ individuals through community action, reducing stigma, and creating knowledge and discourse on these topics.

Dr. Tamara Franz-Odendaal, Biology

Quality Education

Dr. Jennifer Brady, Applied Human Nutrition

Dr. Brady’s research explores the intersections of food, health, and social justice, with an emphasis on health professions’ roles in social justice as practitioners and advocates. Health professions can and should play an important part in redressing social and structural inequities that contribute to poverty, food insecurity, sexism, racism, and other forms of oppression that limit sustainable development around the world.

Dr. Tamara Franz-Odendaal, Biology

Gender Equality

Dr. Derek Fisher, Psychology

 

Dr. Phillip Joy, Applied Human Nutrition

Dr. Joy’s work seeks to improve health, wellbeing, and equality for gender diverse groups, such as LGBTQ individuals through community action, reducing stigma, and creating knowledge and discourse on these topics.

Dr. Tamara Franz-Odendaal, Biology

Clean Water and Sanitation

Coming soon

Affordable and Clean Energy

Coming soon

Decent Work and Economic Growth

Coming soon

Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure

Coming soon

Reducing Inequality

Dr. Jennifer Brady, Applied Human Nutrition

Dr. Brady’s research explores the intersections of food, health, and social justice, with an emphasis on health professions’ roles in social justice as practitioners and advocates. Health professions can and should play an important part in redressing social and structural inequities that contribute to poverty, food insecurity, sexism, racism, and other forms of oppression that limit sustainable development around the world.

Dr. Phillip Joy, Applied Human Nutrition

Dr. Joy’s work seeks to improve health, wellbeing, and equality for gender diverse groups, such as LGBTQ individuals through community action, reducing stigma, and creating knowledge and discourse on these topics.

Dr. Tamara Franz-Odendaal, Biology

 

Sustainable Cities and Communities

Coming soon

Responsible Consumption and Production

Coming soon

Climate Action

Life Below Water

Coming soon

Life on Land

Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions

Coming soon

Partnerships for the Goals

Coming soon