SameSexMarriageStudyBanner 

NOTE: Banner images should be placed in this first content block and should be at least 720px wide.

About the Study

You are invited to take part in a research study being conducted by Dr. Áine Humble from the Department of Family Studies and Gerontology at Mount Saint Vincent University (MSVU).

The study examines how people move from rejection of same-sex marriage to accepting it. Specifically, what kind of factors leads to people changing their minds from not being supportive of it, to being supportive.

Is there a specific event or conversation that changes a person's mind? Is it a process that takes place over a longer period of time? The study would like to hear from people who changed their opinions about same-sex marriage, particularly after a relative announced that they were marrying their same-sex partner.

Eligible Participants

Individuals from both Canada (age 19 and over) and the United States (age 21 and over) are eligible to participate in this study.

The study is interested in interviewing people:

  1. Who had a relative marry in a same-sex marriage within the past five years
  2. Who were originally against the marriage but over time came to support it (this may have occurred before or after the wedding)
Confidential interviews will last approximately one hour, and will take place in person, over the phone, or through Skype.

Please contact Dr. Áine Humble at +1 902-457-6109 (confidential messages can be left for Dr. Humble), or by email at msvu.ca.

Further Reading

This study extends previous work Dr. Humble has done on the topic of wedding experiences and same-sex couples.

Humble, A. M. (2016). "She didn't bat an eye": Canadian same-sex wedding planning and support from the wedding industry. Journal of GLBT Family Studies, 12, 277-299.

Humble, A.M. (2013). Moving from ambivalence to certainty: Older same-sex couples marry in Canada. Canadian Journal on Aging, 32(2), 131-144.


For more information about Dr. Humble, please visit her MSVU faculty profile.

Note: This study has received ethics approval from Mount Saint Vincent University's Review Ethics Board (#2017-027).