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2013-2014 COURSES BY AREA OF STUDY

 

EUROPE

WORLD

NORTH AMERICA

OTHER

SUMMER SCHOOL

 

EUROPE:


2200 History of Greece (half unit)

Fall, Tuesday/Thursday, 3:00 to 4:15

David Campbell

 

A survey of the history of Greece including the Minoan-Mycenaean civilizations, the development of political institutions including democracy, the Persian Wars, Periclean Athens, the rise of Macedon and the achievement of Alexander the Great.

 

 

2201 History of Rome (half unit)

Winter, Tuesday/Thursday, 3:00 to 4:15

David Campbell


A survey of the history of Rome including the Etruscans, the unification of the Italian peninsula, the conquest of the Mediterranean, Julius Caesar and the Roman revolution, the Augustan principate, the life and times of the emperors, the rise of the Christian Church and the fall of Rome.

 

 

2202 Medieval History (one unit)

Fall/Winter, Monday/Wednesday, 1:30 to 2:45

Roni Gechtman


In this course we will study the long period in European history, between the fall of the Roman

Empire and the Renaissance of the fifteenth century, that later came to be known as the “Middle” Ages. Some of the themes we will explore are the waning of the Roman civilization, the rise of the feudal system, the expansion of Christianity and Islam, the Crusades, the conflict between popes and emperors, Romanesque and Gothic art and architecture, the rebirth of agriculture and commerce towards the end of the first millennium, gender roles in medieval Europe, the Italian city states, and the rise of literature in the vernacular languages. Students will have the chance to analyze a wide range of primary sources (including, in the second term, sections of Dante’s Divine Comedy) and numerous works of art.

 

 

2207 Social History of European Women (half unit)

Section 01, Fall, Tuesday/Thursday, 12:00 to 1:15

Section 20, Fall, Contact the Department of Distance Learning and Continuing Education

Adriana Benzaquén


This course provides an overview of the history of European women from the early modern period
to the twentieth century. We will explore the changing lives, identities, opportunities, and political activism of European women throughout this period and consider the different ways in which they experienced family life, work, politics, culture, religion, sexuality, and war. We will also examine changes in understandings of women’s nature, women’s roles in society, women’s rights, and relations between women and men. The format of the course will be a combination of lectures and class discussions of assigned readings.

(This course is also listed as a women-emphasis course).

 

 

2233 Christian Traditions (half unit)

Fall, Tuesday/Thursday, 6:00 to 7:15

Arthur McCalla


An historical overview of the development of Christianity as a world religion, using both primary

and secondary materials


2281 History of Childhood: The European Experience (half unit) CANCELLED
Section 01, Fall, Tuesday/Thursday, 1:30 to 2:45
Section 20, Fall, Contact the Department of Distance Learning and Continuing Education
Instructor to be announced

An examination of the changing attitude toward children in western civilization: the evolution of

family relationships, the concept of childhood, the development of educational thought. Such

problems as infanticide, child labour, penal practices, dependency and children’s rights legislation are also considered.

 

 

3314 Witches, Witch Hunters and Scholars in Early Modern Europe (half unit)

Winter, Tuesday/Thursday, 12:00 to 1:15

Adriana Benzaquén


In this course we will explore the tension between different kinds of belief and different forms of

knowledge in early modern Europe through an examination of two important historical

developments: the witch-hunt that took place across both Catholic and Protestant Europe and the emergence of modern science. Why were so many thousands of people, most of them women, persecuted, tried, and executed for witchcraft in this period? In what sense was the new science of Galileo, Bacon, Descartes, and Newton really new? To what extent did the new scientific thinking contribute to the end of the witch-hunt? The format of the course will be a combination of lectures, student presentations, and class discussions of assigned readings. We will read a selection of primary sources and consider a variety of recent historical approaches to, and interpretations of, the clash of worldviews in this period.

Note: Students who have received credit for HIST 3313 may not take this course for credit.

 

 

3340 The Bible and Historical Thought (half unit)

Winter, Tuesday/Thursday, 1:30 to 2:45

Arthur McCalla


An examination of the rise of historical thinking in various scientific disciplines, from the

seventeenth century onwards, in their complex relation to the status of the Bible as an historical

authority. Topic to be discussed may include the age of the Earth, the history of life, biblical

criticism, and the evolution/creationism controversy.

 

 

3385 Selected Topics in Twentieth Century History:

The First World War in History and Memory (half unit)

Fall, Monday, 4:30-7:00

David Campbell


A combined lecture-seminar course on a selected topic in twentieth-century history. This year's topic is the First World War in history and memory.

 

 

4480 History Seminar: The Spanish Revolution/Civil War (half unit)

Fall, Thursday, 4:30 to 7:00

Roni Gechtman


This seminar will examine the history of Spain in the 1930s, giving particular attention to one of the most crucial events in European history in the interwar period: the Spanish Civil War, a conflict that began in 1936 and ended a few months before the outbreak of the Second World War. There were two warring sides —republicans and nationalists— but each one was composed of many different social and political factions. Thus one of the goals of this seminar will be to understand the issues that provoked the war and led to the formation of the two (seemingly cohesive, but in fact internally divided) opposing camps. The Spanish Civil War is especially interesting to historians both in itself and for its significance in relation to the general history of the period. We will consider the extent to which the conflict in Spain epitomizes similar conflicts faced by almost all states in Europe at the time: the clash of classes (peasants, workers, middle classes, aristocracy), ideologies (fascism, conservatism, liberalism, socialism, communism, anarchism), and political regimes (monarchy, dictatorship, representative democracy); struggles around gender and sexuality, nationalism and internationalism, centralism and regionalism; and competing views of the role of church and military in the modern state. The Spanish Civil War (also known as the Spanish Revolution) aroused hope and enthusiasm among left-leaning workers, intellectuals and activists all over the world, hundreds of thousands of whom went to Spain as volunteers ‘to fight fascism’. But these hopes were crushed and Franco’s victory in 1939 initiated a long period of military dictatorship and repression.


 

WORLD:

 

1130 World History (one unit)

Fall/Winter, Tuesday/Thursday, 9:00 to 10:15

Jonathan Roberts


This course will introduce students to theories and interpretations of history in China, India, the

Middle East, Africa, and Europe. The first half of the course will cover the concepts of “Global”

and “World” History, with a special focus on genetic evidence, the histories of the Zhou dynasty, the Aryan controversy, Greek historia, Arabic Tarikhs, and African oral traditions. The second half will discuss prominent works of universal and materialist history from the modern Western historiographical tradition. The purpose of the course is to expand the scope of the narrative of history beyond western categories of historical analysis.

 

 

2251 Plagues and Peoples: A World History of Epidemics (half unit)

Fall, Monday/Wednesday, 10:30 to 11:45

Jonathan Roberts


The outbreak of disease exposes the existential concerns of human beings, and often causes rapid changes to societies and cultures. This course will trace the history of diseases and their

corresponding medical responses, with a special emphasis on trans-cultural medical encounters. The goal of the course is to investigate the universality of human health concerns while at the same time recognizing the diversity of healing cultures around the world.

 

 

2289 The World in the Postwar Era (half unit)

Section 01, Winter, Monday/Wednesday, 10:30 to 11:45

Section 20, Winter, Contact the Department of Distance Learning and Continuing

Education

Roni Gechtman


The aim of this course is to examine the many transformations experienced at the global level since the end of the Second World War. We will focus on selected issues and events —including postwar reconstruction, the Cold War, decolonization, the Chinese and Cuban Revolutions, dictatorship and democracy in Latin America, the fall of the Soviet Bloc, the Gulf Wars and the Arab Spring— in order to highlight defining moments of the postwar era. The three main themes around which the course will be organized are: the relations between blocks of countries, the international economy, and the conflicts in the post-colonial world. The course will allow students to understand, and make informed judgements about, the complex and evolving international relations and social processes of the contemporary world.

Note: Students who have received credit for HIST 3389 may not take this course for credit.

 

 

3361 Selected Topics in World History: The Story of Modern Africa (half unit)

Winter, Monday/Wednesday, 3:00 to 4:15

Section 20, Winter, Contact the Department of Distance Learning and Continuing

Education

Jonathan Roberts


'I do not want to miss a good chance of getting us a slice of this magnificent African cake.' King Leopold II. 1876.

Over the winter of 1885-6, the major powers of Europe met in Berlin to carve up the African

continent into colonies and spheres of influence, initiating new and oppressive forms of colonialism. This event came to be known as the ‘Scramble for Africa’ and it is now a turning point in Western narratives that emphasize a legacy of European exploitation of the continent. In this course, students will be asked to challenge this conventional narrative of modern Africa and conceptualize a history of modernity from an African perspective.


 

NORTH AMERICA :

 

1120 Canada (one unit)

Fall/Winter, Monday/Wednesday, 9:00 to 10:15

Leslie Baker


This is an introductory survey of Canadian history, from the contact period to the present day.

Lectures are designed to acquaint students with major issues and problems in Canadian history, range widely in theme and content, and delve into economic, social, political, and cultural history. Major issues covered in the first term are the confrontation between Native and non-Native cultures, the relationship of the colonies to the empires of France and Great Britain, the growth of colonial identities and self-government, and confederation and the early nation-building process. The second term focuses primarily on the attempt to adapt the federal system to meet competing demands of region and nation, French and English, rich and poor, as well as the external demands of the international arena.

(This course is also listed under Canadian Studies).

 

 

2218 Canadian-American Relations: Continental Nations (half unit)

Winter, Tuesday, 4:30 to 7:00

Brian Foster


This course examines the evolving economic, cultural and, particularly, diplomatic relationship

between the United States and Canada. While the course begins with the American Revolution, the primary focus is on the twentieth century, when Canada progressively gained control over its external relations. Topics to be covered include the impact of the American Civil War on Canada, the rise of American Imperialism, and the effect of growing continental integration.

(This course is also listed under Canadian Studies).

 

 

2222 Canadian Women in Historical Perspective (half unit)

Winter, Monday/Wednesday, 9:00 to 10:15

Martha Walls


An examination of the participation and contribution of women in Canadian history from the

sixteenth century to the modern feminist movement. Topics may include earlier forms of sexual

stereotyping, famous Canadian women, women at work in the nineteenth and early twentieth

centuries, and Nova Scotia women.

(This course is also listed under Canadian Studies and Women’s Studies).

 

 

2230 History of the Maritime Provinces to Confederation (half unit)

Fall, Monday/Wednesday, 12:00 to 1:15

Leslie Baker


This is a survey of the history of the Atlantic region from the contact period down to Confederation in 1867. Attention focuses initially on the first contact between Europeans and Native peoples, thereafter on the strategic importance of the area for the rival empires of France, Great Britain, and the United States of America, and the consequent effect this had on economic, social, and political change in the region. Students are asked to explore how, within this general imperial and regional context, individuals struggled to wrest a living from sea, land, and forest, and, in the process, establish distinctive communities. Themes pursued include Native and non-Native interaction, the pattern and pace of European immigration (with particular emphasis on the expulsion of the Acadians), the bases of unity and diversity within the region, and provincial attempts to reach some measure of economic prosperity, social cohesion, political maturity, and cultural sophistication. This course culminates with an examination of the impulses that led the region to participate in Confederation.

(This course is also listed under Canadian Studies).

 

 

2231 History of the Maritime Provinces since Confederation (half unit)

Winter, Monday/Wednesday, 12:00 to 1:15

Martha Walls


This course provides a survey of the history of the Maritime provinces since Confederation. It focuses on the integration of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island into the Canadian nation, and their subsequent political, economic, social, and cultural development.

(This course is also listed under Canadian Studies).

 

 

2282 History of Childhood: The North American Exerience (half unit)

Winter, Tuesday/Thursday, 1:30 to 2:45

Frances Early


This course examines selected aspects of the history of childhood in North America from the

beginning of European settlement to the twenty-first century. We will consider the experiences of children in rural, pre-industrial and modern urban-industrial settings; as well, children’s experiences of war will be examined with focus upon the World War II era. Other themes and topics include changing perceptions of children and interpretations of the meaning of childhood; the place of children in the family and their role in the economy in different eras; children under enslavement in the U.S. antebellum South; and social and educational policies pertaining to children, notably aboriginal Canadian children. We will also study the North American experience of growing up in a female body over the course of the twentieth century and consider how popular culture at the beginning of the twenty-first century is negotiating the challenge of Third Wave Feminism.

 

 

3304 Gender in Historical Perspective: Gender and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada  (half unit)

Fall, Tuesday/Thursday, 10:30 to 11:45

Martha Walls


The course considers key themes in the historical experiences of Aboriginal men and women in Canada, with a particular emphasis on how Aboriginal women uniquely experienced colonialism. From first encounter with Europeans in the 16th century, Aboriginal peoples faced extraordinary challenges to their own social, economic and political traditions. Based on lectures, films and critical readings of primary documents and secondary scholarship, this course will highlight the ways in which gender influenced how Aboriginal men and women experienced and responded to these challenges. Topics to be considered include: the pre-encounter era viewed through the lens of gender; gender and early encounter; gender and the policies of colonization (ex. the Indian Act and Residential Schooling); the impact of colonization on women’s families, bodies and health; Aboriginal women’s relationships with the legal system; and Aboriginal women’s persistent resistance of colonialism. .

(This course is also listed under Women’s Studies)

 

 

3329 Modern Canada (half unit)

Fall, Tuesday, 4:30 to 7:00

Roger Marsters


This course is designed to introduce students to the history of Modern Canada, which will be

defined as the era of the Keynesian welfare state (roughly from 1945-1985). We will use a brief

survey of the impact of the Great Depression and Second World War on Canadian society as our starting point, and then thematically examine the changes to that society that occurred during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, ending with a brief discussion of the rise of neo-liberalism in the 1980s.

 

 

3337 Revolution, Reform, Reaction: U.S. Protest Movements in the 1960's (half unit)

Winter, Tuesday/Thursday, 10:30 to 11:45

Frances Early


Utilizing both primary and secondary sources, this course will examine the major protest movements that arose in response to conditions in post-World War II America. Topics include the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, the New Left, the Anti-War Movement, the Counterculture, and the Women's Liberation Movement. Evaluation will be based on an in-class document test, a chronology assignment, a film review, and a final exam.

(This course is also listed under Peace and Conflict Studies).


4481 History Seminar: North America: (half unit)

Winter, Thursday, 4:30 to 7:00

Martha Walls


The topics for research and discussion will be determined by the professor and students in the

seminar.

Prerequisite: written permission from the Chair of the Department of History


 

OTHER:

 

3390 Historiography (half unit)

Fall, Wednesday, 4:30 to 7:00

Martha Walls


An examination of questions concerning the nature and value of historical inquiry and historical

writing.

Prerequisite: written permission of the Chair of the Department of History

 

 

3391 Historical Methodology (half unit)

Winter, Wednesday, 4:30 to 7:00

Frances Early


This seminar course for history majors examines contemporary approaches to history on a variety of topics and focuses on the conceptual frameworks and practical problems associated with historical research and analysis. Course readings will be diverse, and evaluation will be based on a range of assignments that are designed to sharpen and deepen the critical intellectual skills required of students who are engaged in the practice of historical research and writing.

Prerequisite: written permission of the Chair of the Department of History


 

SUMMER SCHOOL 2013

 

Summer Session I

 

2230 History of the Maritime Provinces to Confederation (half unit)

Contact the Department of Distance Learning and Continuing Education

Corey Slumkoski


This course surveys the formation and growth of settlement in the Maritime region down to

Confederation. Lectures focus initially on the period of first contact between Europeans and Native Peoples, thereafter on the strategic importance of the area for the rival empires of France, Great Britain and the United States of America, and the consequent effect this had on economic, social, and political change in the region. Students are asked to explore how, within this general imperial and regional context, individuals struggled to wrest a living from sea, land, and forest, and, in the process, established distinctive communities. Themes pursued include Native and Non-Native interaction, the pattern and pace of European immigration (with particular emphasis on the expulsion of the Acadians), the bases of unity and diversity within the region, and provincial

attempts to reach some measure of economic self-sufficiency, social cohesion, political maturity, and cultural sophistication. This course culminates with an examination of the impulses that led the region to participate in Confederation.

(This course is also listed under Canadian Studies).

 

 

2281 History of Childhood: The European Experience (half unit)

Contact the Department of Distance Learning and Continuing Education

Jennifer Grabove


An examination of the changing attitude toward children in western civilization: the evolution of

family relationships, the concept of childhood, the development of educational thought. Such

problems as infanticide, child labour, penal practices, dependency and children’s rights legislation arealso considered.

 

 

Summer Session II

 

2231 History of the Maritime Provinces since Confederation (half unit)

Contact the Department of Distance Learning and Continuing Education

Martha Walls


A survey of the history of the Maritime provinces since Confederation, this course is preoccupied
with the economic, social, political, and cultural position of the region within the context of the Canadian nation. After an initial examination of the process of integration into the new union, attention focuses on such general questions as: What were the opportunities and constraints of Confederation? To what extent were Maritimers masters of their own destiny? To what extent was the region Canadianized? Themes pursued include regional underdevelopment, Maritime responses to modernization (particularly those of groups traditionally disadvantaged on the basis of gender, race or class), and regional contributions to the nation in time of both war and peace.

(This course is also listed under Canadian Studies).