NOTE: Banner images should be placed in this first content block and should be at least 720px wide.

During the 2017-2018 academic year we will be offering the following courses:

Jump to a specific section: 

EUROPE

1102 — The West and the World: From the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment (half unit)
Fall, Tuesday/Thursday, 10:30 to 11:45
Roni Gechtman

HIST 1102-1103An overview of European history and Western civilization from the fall of the Roman Empire (fifth century) to the eighteenth century. This course provides a general outline of the major historical developments and changes in pre-modern European societies while introducing students to the discipline of history. The main topics covered in this course are: the fall of Rome, the rise of Byzantium and Islam, Feudalism, Medieval art and culture, the Renaissance, European expansion, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment. The course also explores Europe’s relations with the rest of the world: how Europeans interacted with other cultures and civilizations through religious and scholarly exchanges, trade, travel and conquest.

Note: Students who have received credit for HIST 1101 may not take this course for credit.

1103 — The West and the World: From the French Revolution to the Modern Day (half unit)
Winter, Tuesday/Thursday, 10:30 to 11:45
Roni Gechtman

An overview of European history and Western civilization covering the period from the late eighteenth to the twentieth century. This course provides a general outline of the major historical developments and changes in modern European societies in the last 250 years while introducing students to the discipline of history. Among the topics covered in this course are: the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era, the Industrial Revolution, Nationalism, Imperialism and the two world wars. This course also investigates the West’s increasingly dominant position in the modern world through conquest and colonial oppression of other regions and peoples.

Note: Students who have received credit for HIST 1101 may not take this course for credit.

2201 — History of Rome (half unit)
Winter, Tuesday/Thursday, 3:00 to 4:15
David Campbell

A survey of the history of Rome including the Etruscans, the unification of the Italian peninsula, the conquest of the Mediterranean, Julius Caesar and the Roman revolution, the Augustan principate, the life and times of the emperors, the rise of the Christian Church and the fall of Rome.

2207 — History of European Women from the Eighteenth Century to the Modern Day (half unit)
Winter, Tuesday/Thursday, 9:00 to 10:15
Adriana Benzaquen

This course explores the dramatic changes in European women’s lives, identities, opportunities, and political activism from the early modern period to the twentieth century. We will consider, on the one hand, how women from different social classes and geographical regions experienced family life, work, politics, culture, religion, sexuality, and war throughout this period, and on the other, different and shifting understandings of women’s nature, women’s roles in society, women’s rights, and relations between women and men.

2211 — Explorers, Artists and Reformers: Renaissance and Reformation Europe (half unit)
Fall, Monday/Wednesday, 1:30 to 2:45
Adriana Benzaquen

HIST 2211The innovations and challenges of the Renaissance and Reformation period shaped Western societies for centuries to come and their implications continue to be felt today. The course first explores the transition from “medieval” to “early modern” Europe. Following a brief introduction to the structures of late medieval society and the crises of the fourteenth century, we will discuss the discoveries and inventions of the Renaissance: the new warfare, the printing press, the voyages of exploration, the “discovery” and conquest of new worlds, changes in production and commerce, the ideals of humanism, Renaissance art, and the rise of centralized states. Then we will examine the Protestant and Catholic Reformations and their social and political consequences. Throughout the course we will attend to the clash between the old and the new and between the enormous improvements experienced by some groups of early modern Europeans and the inordinate suffering and misery endured by a great many others.

2281 — History of Childhood: The European Experience (half unit)
Section 01, Fall, Monday/Wednesday, 10:30 to 11:45
Section 20, Fall, Downloadable video via Moodle on Collaborate sessions
Adriana Benzaquén

This course offers an overview of the history of childhood and children in Europe from antiquity to the present. We will explore changes and continuities in concepts of childhood and attitudes towards children. We will also examine children’s diverse experiences of family life, work, education and apprenticeship, play, religion, friendship, health and illness, consumption, and war.

2285 — Love, Sexuality and the Body in European History (half unit)
Section 01, Winter, Monday/Wednesday, 10:30 to 11:45
Section 20, Winter, Downloadable video via Moodle on Collaborate sessions
Adriana Benzaquén

In this course we will explore changing views, attitudes, practices and regulations regarding love, sexuality and the body in European history from antiquity to the late twentieth century. We will also consider how the history of love and sexuality intersects with other developments in the political, intellectual, social and cultural history of Europe. Some of the topics we will discuss include: a) the different cultural forms that love and marriage have taken in the European past (arranged marriages and marriages of convenience; chivalric, romantic and “true” love; marital fidelity and adulterous relationships; companionate and sexually-compatible marriages); b) changing understandings of sexual desire and sexual behaviour (desire as dangerous or liberating; heterosexual and same-sex acts and relations; celibacy, virginity and chastity); c) the social, political, religious and medical regulation of bodies and sexualities (sexual norms and sexual deviance; the sexual “double standard”; sexual health and disease; contraception and abortion; prostitution and pornography); d) European interest in non-European sexualities (relations between Europeans and non-Europeans in the context of overseas exploration, conquest, colonization and imperialism); e) the rise of sexual orientations, identities, communities and movements.

3315 — The French Revolution and Napoleon (half unit)
Winter, Monday/Wednesday, 1:30 to 2:45
Adriana Benzaquén

In this course we will study one of the most important periods in modern European history: the years of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic regime. The events that took place in France between 1789 and 1815 had a profound impact on the rest of Europe and much of the world, at the time and in subsequent generations. To make sense of the revolutionary events we will examine them in detail as they were experienced and described by the historical actors themselves and interpreted by later historians. First we will investigate the origins of the Revolution by considering the tensions existing in France during the “old regime.” Then we will review the political, economic, social and cultural changes of the revolutionary decade (1789-1799). Finally, we will explore the contributions, achievements and failures of Napoleon Bonaparte as First Consul and Emperor. At the end of the course we will assess the legacy of the Revolution and Napoleon and ascertain the extent to which they transformed France, Europe and the world. We will then be able to address questions that have preoccupied historians and students of history for more than two centuries, such as whether the significance of the French Revolution is best encapsulated in the revolutionary slogan “liberty, equality, fraternity” or the image of the guillotine severing thousands of heads during the Reign of Terror, and whether Napoleon is better understood as the preserver of the rights and freedoms achieved during the Revolution or as a ruthless dictator driven only by personal ambition.

3370 — Selected Topics in European History: Reason, Faith and History in Nineteenth-Century Europe (half unit)
Winter, Thursday, 4:30 to 7:00
Arthur McCalla

The nineteenth century witnessed both an unprecedented intellectual challenge to the authority of religion in Western culture and a powerful renewal of religious thought. Central to both was a new appreciation of history, which required a rethinking of old debates about reason and faith. This intellectual history seminar explores the emergence of modern approaches to religion through in-depth readings of works by great thinkers of the age, including Lessing, Kant, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Joseph de Maistre, John Henry Newman, Nietzsche, and Darwin.

3382 — European Nationalism (half unit)
Winter, Tuesday/Thursday, 1:30 to 2:45
Roni Gechtman

The purpose of this course is to understand the phenomenon of European nationalism through the examination of its historical manifestations in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. To this end we will read some of the key documents related to nationalism in this period and analyze the work of recent historians and theorists who have studied the phenomena of nations and nationalism, such as Eric Hobsbawm, Miroslav Hroch, Benedict Anderson and Ernest Gellner.

4480 — History Seminar: Reason, Faith and History in Nineteenth-Century Europe (half unit)
Winter, Thursday, 4:30 to 7:00
Arthur McCalla

The nineteenth century witnessed both an unprecedented intellectual challenge to the authority of religion in Western culture and a powerful renewal of religious thought. Central to both was a new appreciation of history, which required a rethinking of old debates about reason and faith. This intellectual history seminar explores the emergence of modern approaches to religion through in-depth readings of works by great thinkers of the age, including Lessing, Kant, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Joseph de Maistre, John Henry Newman, Nietzsche, and Darwin.

Prerequisite: written permission from the Chair of the Department of History


WORLD

HIST 22512251 — Plagues and Peoples: A World History of Epidemics (half unit)
Winter, Tuesday, 4:30 to 7:00
Leslie Baker

An introduction to the history of epidemics and their corresponding medical responses. The outbreak of disease exposes the existential concerns of human beings and often results in social and cultural upheaval. This course investigates the universality of human health concerns while recognizing the diversity of healing cultures around the world.

2289 — The World in the Postwar Era (half unit)
Fall, Monday/Wednesday, 12:00 to 1:15
Gregg French

An overview of the major political, social and cultural developments in world history since the end of World War II, including postwar reconstruction, the Cold War, decolonization, the Chinese and Cuban Revolutions, dictatorship and democracy in Latin America, the fall of the Soviet Bloc, the Gulf Wars and the Arab Spring.

3360 — Selected Topics in World History: The Silk Road: Cultures in Contact (half unit)
Fall, Tuesday/Thursday, 1:30 to 2:45
Arthur McCalla

HIST 3360The caravans that traversed the Silk Road—the network of routes across central Asia connecting East and West—carried far more than trade goods such as spices, paper, tea, and textiles. This world history course explores the role of cross-cultural contact as a driving force in history by examining biological, commercial, technological, cultural, and religious exchanges across Eurasia from approximately 500 BCE to 1600 CE.


NORTH AMERICA

1121 — Canoes and Colonialism: A History of Canada to Confederation (half unit)
Fall, Tuesday/Thursday, 12:00 to 1:15
David Campbell

HIST 1121-1122An introduction to the history of Canada from the pre-contact period until Canadian Confederation in 1867. Special emphasis will be placed upon political, economic, and some social factors which have contributed to the growth of the Canadian nation and a national identity.

Note: This course is also listed under Canadian Studies.
Note: Students who have received credit for HIST 1101 may not take this course for credit.

1122 — Consolidation and Conflict: A History of Canada from Confederation (half unit)
Winter, Tuesday/Thursday, 12:00 to 1:15
David Campbell

An introduction to the history of Canada from the Canadian Confederation in 1867 to the present day. Special emphasis will be placed upon political, economic, and some social factors which have contributed to the growth of the Canadian nation and a national identity.

Note: This course is also listed under Canadian Studies.
Note: Students who have received credit for HIST 1101 may not take this course for credit.

2216/POLS 2216 — Allies and Anti-Americanism: A History of Canadian-American Relations (half unit)
Fall, Monday, 4:30 to 7:00
Susan Joudrey

A survey of Canadian-American relations from the American Revolution to the present day. Topics covered include the development of separate American provincial societies, the evolution of a North American economy and culture, policy making and bilateral relations, and complementary and conflicting national interests in political, economic, and cultural issues.

2222 — Canadian Women in Historical Perspective (half unit)
Fall, Monday/Wednesday, 9:00 to 10:15
Section 20, Fall, Downloadable video via Moodle on Collaborate sessions
Martha Walls

HIST 2222 considers the historical social, economic, and political experiences of Canadian women from before the arrival of Europeans through to the 21st century. It will consider women’s work, family life, and issues of sexuality, tracing how the status of women has changed over time. Emphasis will be placed on how women themselves worked to broaden their social, economic and political opportunities. We will also consider how class and ethnicity shaped the experiences of Canadian women.

2231 — History of the Atlantic Provinces since Confederation (half unit)
Winter, Monday/Wednesday, 9:00 to 10:15
Martha Walls

HIST 2231HIST 2231 explores the post-Confederation history of the Maritime Provinces, with reflection on the region’s connection to Newfoundland and Labrador. Drawing on lectures, readings, films, and primary sources, we will consider social, economic and political forces at play in the region. Themes include: the roots of economic (under)development; the experiences of Acadians, Indigenous people, and African Atlantic Canadians; women’s contributions to Maritime society; the world wars; social reform; and the impact of modernity and state intervention.

Note: This course is also listed under Canadian Studies.

2234 — Firebrands, Flappers and Feminists: U.S. Women’s History in the Modern Era (half unit)
Fall, Tuesday/Thursday, 9:00 to 10:15
Susanna Weygandt

An examination of the historical experiences of women in U.S. society in the modern era, beginning in the 1890's. Discrete topics will stress women as historical actors, notably in social change movements. The personal as well as public aspects of women’s lives in contrasting historical circumstances will be explored.

Note: This course is also listed under Women’s Studies.

2237/POLS 2237 — American Religious History: From Covenant to Cults (half unit)
Winter, Tuesday/Thursday, 12:00 to 1:15
Arthur McCalla

The United States is unique among Western countries in the intensity and diversity of its religiosity. This course offers both a thematically-organized survey of the content of American religions history—including the “invisible institution” and Father Divine, Nature Religion and Transcendentalism, new American expressions of Christianity and new religions, spirit churches and Spiritualists, eastern religions and religious pluralism—and explores social, cultural, and political explanations for the status of religion in America.

3320 — Selected Topics in North American History: Atlantic Canada First Nations (half unit)
Fall, Thursday, 4:30 to 7:00
Martha Walls

This course requires students to engage with important secondary and primary texts related the histories of the Indigenous peoples of Atlantic Canada. Themes include: the pre-encounter era, Indigenous-European exchanges of culture; colonial oppression; resistances of Indigenous peoples to colonialism; Indian Residential schooling; issues of treaty and land rights.

3323 — History of Indigenous Women in Canada (half unit)
Winter, Monday/Wednesday, 12:00 to 1:15
Martha Walls

HIST 3323 considers keys themes in the historical experiences of Indigenous women in Canada through to the 21st century. Based on lectures, films and critical readings of primary documents and secondary scholarship, the course explores how Indigenous women experienced colonialism and responded to its challenges. Topics include: the pre-encounter era viewed through the lens of gender; women and early encounter; gender and the policies of colonization (ex. the Indian Act and Residential Schooling); the impact of colonization on women’s families, bodies and health; Indigenous women’s resistance of colonialism; Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

3385 — Selected Topics in Twentieth-Century History: Canada at War (half unit)
Fall, Tuesday/Thursday, 3:00 to 4:15
David Campbell

Description to follow.

4481 — History Seminar: North America: Atlantic Canada First Nations (half unit)
Fall, Thursday, 4:30 to 7:00
Martha Walls

HIST 4481 requires students to engage with important secondary and primary texts related the histories of the Indigenous peoples of Atlantic Canada. Themes include: the pre-encounter era, Indigenous-European exchanges of culture; colonial oppression; resistances of Indigenous peoples to colonialism; Indian Residential schooling; issues of treaty and land rights.

Prerequisite: written permission from the Chair of the Department of History


OTHER

3390 — Historiography (half unit)
Winter, Wednesday, 4:30 to 7:00
Martha Walls

HIST 3390 introduces students to basic theories, practices, and problems of historical writing and inquiry – what is called historiography. We will examine important milestones in the development of history as field of study, assess theories that have influenced the writing of history, and consider how historians know and represent the past and how this knowledge and representation have shifted over time.

Prerequisite: written permission of the Chair of the Department of History

3391 — Historical Methodology (half unit)
Fall, Wednesday, 4:30 to 7:00
Leslie Baker

An introduction to the wide variety of source materials that can be used to generate stories about the past. Some topics include genetic material as historical evidence, language as a vessel of historical knowledge, oral tradition, cartography as history and myth, and how to mine rumors and gossip for historical evidence. Students will be asked to choose a particular source material and write a research paper about how it contains information about the past.

Prerequisite: written permission of the Chair of the Department of History